An Introduction to Basic Statistics for Biologists using R Online Course – Session Three

This is Session Three of an online course based around the book An Introduction to Basic Statistics for Biologists using R, and it assumes that you have a copy of this book in front of you so you can follow the instructions for each exercise provided in it. To purchase this book, click here. If you would prefer to complete an in-person or distance-learning version of this course with a live instructor, click here to find out more.

The information on this page will take you through the exercises in Chapter Five of the above book. These exercises cover assessing and transforming the distribution of biological data. You can find the index page for this course here.

Assessing and Transforming the Distribution of Biological Data using R.

Overview: In this session, you will learn about what a normal distribution is, why it is important to objectivey test whether your data have a normal distribution, how to test for normality and how to use mathematical transformations to normalise non-normal data so you can apply parametric statistical tests to them.

Part One – Introductory Video

This introductory video provides a summary of the introductory information for this chapter you will find on pages 102 and 103 of An Introduction to Basic Statistics for Biologists using R. If you cannot see the video in the space below click here to open a pop-out video viewer for it.



Part Two – Getting Started

This video outlines what you need to do to get ready to start the exercises in this chapter. The instructions fordoing this can be found on pages 103 to 105 of An Introduction to Basic Statistics for Biologists using R. If you cannot see the video in the space below click here to open a pop-out video viewer for it.



Part Three – Exercise 3.1: How to Assess Whether a Biological Data Set has a Normal Distribution using R

This video provides an introduction to this exercise, including what it will cover, why it is important and how your data need to be structured to run a normality test on your own data. This information can also be found on page 106 of An Introduction to Basic Statistics for Biologists using R. If you cannot see the video in the space below click here to open a pop-out video viewer for it.

Once you have watched this video, you can complete this exercise by working through the instructions on pages 107 to 116 of An Introduction to Basic Statistics for Biologists using R. These will provide you with all the information you need to do this.



Part Four – Exercise 3.2: How to Normalise Biological Data using a Mathematical Transformation in R

This video provides an introduction to this exercise, including what it will cover, why it is important and how your data need to be structured to apply mathematical transformations to your own data. This information can also be found on pages 116 and 117 of An Introduction to Basic Statistics for Biologists using R. If you cannot see the video in the space below click here to open a pop-out video viewer for it.

Once you have watched this video, you can complete this exercise by working through the instructions on pages 118 to 126 of An Introduction to Basic Statistics for Biologists using R. These will provide you with all the information you need to do this.



End

Once you have worked through both exercises in this session, you can click here to move on to Session Four (based on Chapter six of An Introduction to Basic Statistics for Biologists using R) or you can click here return to the index page for this course.